www.444thbg.org

The Official 444th Bombardment Group Association

Pete Sabo

Dedicated to Sgt. Pete Sabo and the other brave crewmen aboard "Black Jack Too". These men were be-headed by the Japanese after their capture,  along with two members of the 40th BG. Please take the time to read all of this information. The members of the 444th BG Assn. extend our hearts to the families of these heroes, and assure them that this event and these men will never be forgotten.

All of the items on this page were provided by Association Member Betty Gracie,  Niece of Sgt. Pete Sabo (except where noted).

(c) Charles Harper

(c) Martin Eigenberger, nephew of Lt. Jerome Eigenberger, Navigator/Bombardier

 

 

C O N F I D E N T I A L

MISSING AIR CREW REPORT
678th Bombardment Squadron
APO #247 c/o Postmaster
San Francisco, California Original - Supplemental
(Unit) (Cross out word not applicable)

1. ORGANIZATION: Location, by Name Tinian, Marianas; Command or Air Force XXI B.C.;
Group 444th Bomb Gp; Squadron 678th Bomb Sq

2. SPECIFY: Place of departure West Field, Tinian. Course 116o Target to lands End.
Target or Intended Destination: Kobe, Japan Type of Mission Combat

3. WEATHER CONDITIONS AND VISIBILITY AT TIME OF CRASH OR WHEN LAST REPORTED: Clear visibility, weather - good.

4. GIVE: (a) Day 5 Month June Year 1945 Time 2342Z and Location 34o 19'N 136o 32' E of last seen whereabouts of missing aircraft.

5. AIRPLANE WAS LOST, OR IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN LOST, AS RESULT OF: (Check only one): Enemy Aircraft ( ); Enemy Anti-Aircraft (x); Other circumstances as follows: None

6. AIRPLANE: Type, Model and Series B-29-16-BA ; AAF Serial Number 42-63451

7. NICKNAME OF AIRCRAFT, If any Black Jack, too

10. THE PERSONS LISTED BELOW ARE RECORDED AS: (a) Battle Casualty Battle Casualty

11. NUMBER OF PERSONS ABOARD AIRCRAFT: Crew 11; Passengers None

Name in Full Home
Crew Position (last name First) Rank Town Status

1. Airplane Com. Palmer, Woodrow B. 1st Lt. Buda, Tx. KIA while POW
2. Pilot Walls, Owen P. 2nd Lt Renton, Wa. KIA while POW
3. Navigator Dailey, Robert F. 2nd Lt. Eastchester, N.Y. KIA while POW
4. Bombardier Coulter, Don A. 1st Lt. Arkansas City, Ks. KIA while POW
5. Flt/Engineer Farish, Henry T. M/Sgt. Al. KIA while POW
6. Radar Opr. Prouty, Eugene J. Sgt. Barahoe, Wi. KIA while POW
7. Radio Opr. Chapman, Willard M. S/Sgt. Clovis, N.M. KIA while POW
8. Snr Gnr Niles, Cleveland T. Jr. S/Sgt. East Saint Louis, Il. KIA while POW
9. Rt Gnr Sabo, Peter (NMI) Sgt. St. Clarisville, Oh. KIA while POW
10. Lt Gnr Romanelli, Joseph W. Sgt. Darby, Pa. KIA
11. Tail Gnr Heisler, Charles A. Sgt. Arnold, Md. KIA while POW

12. IDENTIFY BELOW THOSE PERSONS WHO ARE BELIEVED TO HAVE LAST KNOWELDGE OF AIRCRAFT, AND CHECK APPROPRIATE COLUMN TO INDICATE BASIS FOR SAME:

Check only One Column

Saw
Name in Full Serial Contacted Last Saw Forced
(Last Name First) Rank Number by Radio Sighted Crash Landing

Shelden, Harold J. Major X

DATE OF REPORT 7 June 1945

ELLIOTT S. TREMAINE,
Captain, Air Corps,
Operations Officer.

17. REMARKS OR EYEWITNESS STATEMENTS:

WEATHER OVER AREA WHERE PLANE WAS SEEN TO CRASH:

Thin overcast - 20000'
.3 Cumulus - Tops 4000'
Visibility - 20 Miles
Surface winds - Southwesterly.

STATEMENT MADE BY MAJOR HAROLD J. SHELDEN, JR., AC

ON AIRCRAFT NUMBER 42-63451

Upon breaking away from the target on a heading of 114o for "land's end", my gunner reported that Aircraft 42-63451, piloted by Lt. Palmer, flying on the low element, had feathered Number three (3) engine. Very shortly thereafter that engine was seen to start running and was immediately feathered for the second time. Aircraft 451 then started losing altitude and dropped out of his position in the low element. I then pulled out of formation, No. 2 in lead element, and proceeded down to act as escort.

While approximately 200 feet above and still descending it was noted that Aircraft 451 was trailing smoke out of Number 3 engine. This condition existed for approximately five minutes at which time a heavy flame broke out trailing from Number 3 engine back to the horizontal stabilizer. Lt. Palmer was at this time holding a steady heading for "land's end" and was gradually descending. At approximately two to three miles before reaching coast, and after having traveled approximately fifteen miles with fire burning furiously, the right wing was seen to buckle at Number 3 engine and break off. The airplane rolled over on its back and started into a vertical nose down spin.

Four parachutes were then seen to open almost simultaneously at an altitude of approximately 11,000 feet; then three more, then two and one. All parachutes were open relatively soon but in the groups as indicated.

The wing was seen to hit on the side of a mountain further inland and sooner than did the remainder of the aircraft which crashed approximately three hundred (300) yards inland from shore and at southeast edge of small settlement along water front.

Two enemy fighters made attacks at an interval of approximately two minutes shortly after Aircraft 451 started blazing fire out of Number 3 engine. The first fighter was destroyed and the second damaged.

One circle was made by escorting aircraft of all chutes at which time a third fighter was seen approximately two miles to the south. The escorting aircraft proceeded on 180o heading out to sea, was followed by fighter for nearly ten minutes and then broke away without being able to make an attack.

I certify this to be a true and accurate account to the best of my knowledge.

HAROLD H. SHELDEN,
Major, Air Corps.
(Airplane Commander)

MACR provided by Sparky Corradina, 40th BG Historian

 

 

 

L to R: Pete Sabo, Henry T. Farrish, & Joseph W Pomanelli. "Somewhere in West Africa"

 

Pete Sabo - MIA Notification from local newspaper

 

Investigative File #741:

Date: 20 November 1946

Report of Investigation Division, Legal Section GHQ, SCAP, Osaka Branch

Inv. Div. No.                    C7D No.               Report by: Lt. Nicholas L. Sullivan

      # 741

Title: B29 crash and murder of airmen at Yoshisu, 5 June 1945

Synopsis of facts: Unknown writer alleges in a letter written to the 83rd Military Government, Tsu Detachment that policeman Sugihara Kawai and Yamamoto killed the survivors of a B-29 plane that crashed near Yoshizu Village on 5 June 1945. Investigation above that the survivors were beheaded near Nagoya City by members of the Tokai Army Unit.

REFERENCES:

Report by Lt. E.H. Maulsby, dated 10 April 1946 (file 3266).

Report By Capt. W.R. Gill, dated 27 August 1946.

Execution of B-29 crewmen in the Nagoya area. Inv. Div. File#73.

DETAILS:

At Tokyo: The basis for the investigation of this crew is an unsigned letter sent to the 83rd Military Government, TSU Detachment. The letter stated in part the following:

“The Massacre to the American prisoners on 5 June 1945 last year at Yoshizu local . Then the policemen (whose names are Sugihara, Kawai, Yamamoto and other village men and women and othermen cut with axes and swords each other and killed two of the prisoners.”

A check made of the Investigation Division Files in Tokyo showed that this B-29 crash was investigated by Lt. W. Maulsby as Case #266, report dated 10 April 1946.

At Osaka: Investigation shows that the only crash in the Yoshizu area occurred on 5 June 1945 between 1000 and 1100 hours, when a crippled B-29 plane returning from a raid over Kobe was attacked by two fighter planes. The B-29 went out of control and crashed into a fisherman’s house located on the sea shore near Shimazu Village, (5 miles away from Yoshizu Village) Wa tarai-gun, Mie ken.

                                                                        Distribution:                                                                     Do not write in this space

 

1 – Prosecution Div.

1 – CDR

3 – Inv. Div. (file #741)

1 – Inv. Div. (file #266)

1 – Withheld Osaka File 

The Fisherman Mr. Iwasaki and all four members of his family were instantly killed. Ten men parachuted from the plane and were all captured.

According to the Missing Air Crew Reports the plane has been identified as a B-29 bomber #42-63451, nickname “Black Jack Too”, from the 21st Bomber Command, 444th Bomb Group, 678th Sqdn, stationed on Tinian. Following is the crew list:

Pilot (AC)            PALMER, Woodrow B.            1st Lt.             0675110

Pilot                WALLS, Owen P.                2nd Lt.             0771849

Navigator            DAILEY, Robert F.              2nd Lt.             01060187

Bombardier            COULTER, Don A.             1st Lt.             0738622

Engineer            FARISH, Henry T. Jr.       M/Sgt.                        34108214

Radar Op.            PROUTY, Eugene J.         Sgt.                 16056708

Radio Op.            CHAPMAN, Willard M.        S/Sgt.             35660665

Gunner            NILES, Cleveland T.         S/Sgt.             36483161

Gunner            SABO, Peter                                    Sgt.                 15337085

Gunner            ROMANELLI, Joseph W.  Sgt.                 33597469

Gunner            MEISLER, Charles A.            Sgt.                 33899272

Identities of the plane and crew were established by one Japanese witness remembering the name of one of the fliers captured as Willard CHAPMAN and the identification of the remains of Sgt. Joseph ROMANELLI, found buried near the site of the crash, by members from the 108 Q.M. Grave Registration Platoon.

Seven of the ten fliers that parachuted from the plane were captured the day of the crash by civilians and members of the civilian defense corps. One of this group of fliers captured that day suffered a severe head wound. Mr. Toshio NODA, the man that captured the injured flier stated the following:

“On the morning 5 June 1945 I was working in my rice paddy near the village of Shimazu, Mie Ken. I noticed a B-29 flying from the direction of Kobe. The plane was leaving a trail of smoke and exploded when it was directly above my rice paddy. I was scared and took cover. Later I went out and although the plane had already crashed I saw three parachutes sailing earthward. I went to search for the fliers and about two hours later I came across the flier lying on the ground on the mountain side. The parachute was caught in a tree and the flier was holding both hands to the back of his head and was groaning. I believe the flier receive the wound from the branch of a tree when he landed by parachute on the mountain side. The wound appeared to be a severe gash on the back of his neck. I torn a bandage from the parachute placed it on his wound to help stop the blood flow. The flier was unable to walk, so I got three other men and we carried the flier on an improvised stretcher and took him to the road below the mountain side. Here the flier was put on a cat and taken to the village office. I then returned home and this was the last I saw of this flier.”

The captured fliers were brought to the Shemazu village Hall where members of the Isobe Unit, Gokyo (153) Division loaded them on a truck and took them to the Division Hdq. In Ujiyamada City, Mie Ken. The six uninjured fliers were then transferred to Ujiyamada Kempei-Tai Hdq. Here they were kept over night and the next morning Warrant Officer Naoyuki YOSHIDA took the fliers by train and turned them over to a Major at the Tokai Army Hdq. In Nagoya City.

The injured flier was taken to the Gokyo Division Dispensary where he was treated by Medical Captain Masaki KAMBARA. The flier died around 0200 hours on 6 June 1945. Captain MAMBARA was interviewed and he states in part the following:

“Around 2300 hours on the 5th of June of last year I was called from my quarters to treat an injured American flier that was brought to Gokyo (153) Division Hdq. In Yamada City, Mie Ken. When I arrived at the Hdq., I found the flier lying on an improvised stretcher directly in front of the Hdq. Bldg. I ordered some men to carry the flier to the Dispensary. At the Dispensary I placed the flier on an examination table and proceed to examine the flier.

I found that the flier was unconscious, his pulse very weak and that he suffered a severe cut and bruise across the occipital bone at the base of the cranium. I immediately injected 1 cc of Vita Camphor to stimulate the heart, bandaged the flier’s wound and then gave the flier a 1 cc injection of Thombogene and then 20 cc of glucose. I then continued giving the flier 1 cc of Vita Camphor injection every thirty minutes. The flier never regained consciousness and passed away at 0200 hours the following day. I wrote a death certificate stating that an unknown American flier died from brain hemorrhage, further agitated by the excess loss of blood. The next morning some soldiers carried the body to the Division Hdq. Office. The wound appeared to have been caused by a blunt edge. I believe the flier must have suffered the wound by hitting his head against a branch or a tree or a rock when he landed by parachute. This is the last time I saw the flier. I believe he was buried that day somewhere in Yamada City, Mie Ken.”

On the ninth of June 1945 three additional fliers who had been hiding in the mountains came down in search of food and were captured by the villagers and by members of a small naval detachment that were stationed in Shimazu Village at that time. The captured fliers were taken to the city hall and than members of the Kemper-Tai took them by train to the Gokyo (153) Division Hdq. in Ujiyamada City. Here they were questioned by a Major SHIMADA. The fliers stated that they were enlisted men stationed on Tinian and that their plane collided with a Japanese plane on their return trip from bombing Kobe City. They also stated that one of their crew members was seriously wounded over Kobe and was with the plane when it crashed. These fliers were kept over night at the Ujiyamada Kempei-Tai Hdq. and the next day (10 June 1945) Sgt. Major Taizio CHOKU took them to the Tokai Hdq. in Nagoya City.

On the 10th of June 1945 the Ujiyamada Kempei-Tai found the body of the eleventh flier about 1000 meters from the site of the crash. Witnesses stated that the body of the flier was still garbed in an unopened parachute and was badly crushed. Dr. Kanichi URAWA of Shimazu Village who examined the body of the flier stated that he found a bullet wound in the fliers left thigh and above this wound he found the remains of a bandage probably used as a tourniquet. The flier, later identified as Sgt. ROMANILLI, was buried near the site of the crash.

No evidence of any atrocity or maltreatment was found to have been committed against the fliers up to the time of their transfer to the Tokai Army Headquarters in Nagoya City. Two of the men Mr. SUGIHARA and Mr. YAMAMOTO, alleged in the letter to have killed the fliers were not even in the vicinity of Shimazu at the time of the crash. Both of the men were living in Matsudaku City. Mr. SUGIHARA was at his home on sick leave and Mr. YAMAOTO was connected with the Matsudaka Police Force. Mr. Haruo KAWAI the third policeman accused of killing the fliers was in Shimazu Village at the time of the crash but denies that the fliers were mistreated in any way.

The survivors of this plane crash were executed on 28 June 1945 near Nagoya City by orders from the Tokai Army Hdq.

Full details of this execution are covered on Inv. Div. Case #73 – Execution of B-29 crewmen in the Nagoya area. The investigation of this crash was previously reported on 10 April 1946 by Lt. MAULSBY in case #266. Since Case #741 is a duplication of case #266, it is closed and a copy of this report is being indicated for file with Case #266.

UNDEVELOPED LEADS: None

STATUS OF THE CASE:  CLOSED

 

 

DETACHMENT A

108TH QM GRAVES REGISTRATION PLATOON

APO 666

                                                                                          22 June 1946

CASE HISTORY No. 186

SUBJECT:  Graves Registration

TO: Appendix to WD QMC Form 1042. 

  1. On 9 June 1946, the body identified as Sgt. Joseph W. Romanelli, ASN 33597469, was recovered from Kowaura, (Central Japan 1: 250,000. Sheet 39 CO-OR 1146.7-1243.4). According to the Japanese report, he had been killed in the action over Kobe and was dead before the plane crash. The plane established as that piloted by 1st Lt. Woodrow B. Palmer, 0-675110, plane No. 42-63451 when questioning of a Japanese interpreter revealed the name of one of the survivors who had been questioned as S/Sgt. Willard M. Chapman, ASN 35660665 – Radio operator.

  1. The body was buried on 10 June 1945 on the day of discovery in the city cemetery of Kowaura. All the clothes except the shorts and undershirt had been confiscated by the Kempei-Tai of Owashi. The laundry mark “R-7469” found in the waist band of the shorts the deceased was found to correspond with that of Joseph W. Romanelli, 33597469.

  1. A report of both this body, covered in Case History No. 186 and the body covered In Case History 187, is repeated in Case History No. 318.

 

                                                                                Ward W. Wengert

                                                                                Sgt., Team 2

                                                                                Recovery Leader

Enclosure (1)

Haruo KAWAI was interrogated at the Osaka Branch Office on 12 September 1946 by Lt. Sullivan. 

Haruo KAWAI, after being duly sworn to speak the truth conscientiously, adding nothing and concealing nothing whatsoever, testified as follows:

Q. What is your full name, age, address and nationality?

A. Haruo KAWAI, 30 years, Asoura, Nakajima-mura, Watarai-gun, Miye Pref.

Q. Do you expect to remain at your present address for the next six months and if not how can your whereabouts in the future be ascertained?

A. Yes.

Q. What is your present occupation?

A. I’m a policeman of the Yoshizu Police Station. 

Q. What was your occupation during the war?

A. I became a member of the Police force in Yoshizu in April 1941 and I’ve been there ever since.

Q. Will you please list the name of the men that held important official offices in the village of Yoshizu from May to August 1945?

A. Village Chief, KOYAMA, Umematsu, Yoshuzu mura, Mura-yama, Watari-gun, Mie Ken. Chief of Police, Yoshuzu Village, ODA, Riichi, now located at Prefectural Police Dept. in Tsu City, Mie Ken. KATO, Jyungo, Now located at Yokkaichi Police Force Mie Ken. KUWABARA, Mitsuzo, Yoshizu-mura, Mie Ken, TSUJI, Shinji, Yoshizu-mura, Mie Ken, SAKAI, Shiro, Shimazu-mura, Watari-gun, Mie Ken, YAMAKAMI, Shigeji, Detective, now located at the Detective Bureau of Mie Prefectural Office, Tsu City.

Q. Did Mr. Sugihara and Mr. Yamamoto work as policemen in Yoshizu village during the war.

A. Mr. Sugihara was on a year sick leave and did not return to duty with the Yoshuzu Police Force until the early part of July 1945. I believe he stayed his leave at his home in Matsudaka City, Mie Ken. During the war Mr. Yamamoto was connected with the Matsudaka Police and he did not join our force until December 1945.

Q. Please describe in detail what you know about the B-29 plane that crashed near Yoshizu village last year.

A. During the morning of 5 June 1945 I was on duty at the Shimazu village Police Office which is located about five miles from Yoshizu City. There had been a huge raid over Kobe that morning and many B-29’s planes returning from raid were flying overhead. Between 1000 and 1100 hours I noticed a smoking and crippled B-29 plane being attacked by two Japanese fighter planes. The b-29 plane went out of control and crashed on the beach near Shimazu village. Before the [plane crashed I counted ten open parachutes in the shy. I then jumped on my bike and road to the scene of the crash. When I arrived I found the plane burning and scattered along the sea shore. I did not see any bodies in the wreckage at that time. The B-29 had crashed near a fisherman house, killing Mr. Iwasaki and all four members of his family. The surrounding wood were burning so I supervised and aided in putting out the fire. I then went back to the police box and around 1200 hours seven fliers were brought in by the villagers and Keibo Dan. The fliers were taken to the City Hall where they were turned over at 1300 hours to some members from the Army Defense Unit, stationed at Isobe, Shima-gun, Mie Ken. The Army men loaded them on a truck and took them to Yamada City. I believe the Army unit turned them over to there Hdq. or to the Kempei-Tai Hdqs stationed in Yamada City. Three more fliers were captured on the ninth of June. One man was captured by a village searching party near Shimazu. The other two fliers were captured by members from the small Naval Detachment stationed in Shimazu. All three fliers were brought to the City Hall during the morning of the ninth and were turned over to a Sgt. Major and sup Pvt. From Yamada Kempei-Tai. The Kempei-Tai men took the fliers by train from Yamada City.

Q. Did you see the first group of seven fliers that were captured?

A. I only saw three fliers of this group. I saw these men standing in one of the rooms at the city hall. I believe the four other fliers that were captured that same day were in another room. Although I can’t describe their appearance, they seemed to be unhurt and in good condition.

Q. Did you see the last group of fliers captured?

A. Yes, I saw them in the same room where I saw the first three fliers. Although they appeared somewhat dirty and tied, they seemed to be in good health. I can’t remember their appearance as it has been so long since I saw them.

Q. Was any medical attention given these captured fliers in the village of Shimazu?

A. No, not that I know of.

Q. Were any of the captured fliers injured?

A. I did not see any injured fliers but later I heard that one of the fliers was injured and later died at the Oji Hospital in Yamada City.

Q. Who did the interpreting for these fliers?

A. Although I don’t know his name I believe one of the villagers in Shimazu-mura spoke a few words of English to the flier. I will try and locate him for you.

Q. Do you know the names or the ranks of any of the captured fliers?

A. I don’t know any of their names but heard that one of the last group of fliers captured was a Lt. 

Q. Did any members of the police force capture any of the fliers?

A. I believe Yamakami, Kuwabara and Tsuji from the Yoshizu police aided in the capture of some of the fliers. The Keibo Dan, Army and Navy and police aided in the search.

Q. How many fliers were killed in the crash?

A. The Yoshizu Chief of Police ODA, a Warrant Officer from the Kempei-Tai and myself examined and buried a fliers body found near the burned wreckage of the plane. The personal effects of the pilot were taken to the Yamada Kempei-Tai Hdq. by the Warrant Officer. On examining the body we found that one of the fliers leg was bandaged. We judge that the flier was hit by flak over Kobe and was not able to make the jump before the plane crashed.

Q. Were any of the fliers killed by the people living in that area?

A. No.

Q. Did you see or hear about any atrocities committed against these fliers?

A. No.

Q. Did you maltreat any of the captured fliers?

A. No.

Q. Are you sure that the flier that later died wasn’t beaten by the villagers, soldiers or police?

A. I believe that the pilot was not beaten but died from injuries received from his jump.

Q. Do you have any other information that would aid in the investigation of this case?

A. No, I have told you all I know about the case.

 

                                                                                   Signature in Japanese

                                                                                        Haruo KAWAI

 (ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Haruo KAWAI, being duly sworn on oath, state that I had read to me and understood the translation of the foregoing transcription of my interrogation and all answers contained therein, consisting of 3 pages, are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.

                                                                                        Signature in Japanese

                                                                                        Haruo KAWAI

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 13th day of September 1946.

                                                                        NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                  0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                  Investigating Officer

                                                                                  Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

 I, Teruo MASATSUGU, 30115539, Pfc., AUS, being duly sworn on oath, state that I truly translated the questions and answers given from English to Japanese and from Japanese to English respectfully, and that after being transcribed, I truly translated the foregoing deposition containing 3 pages, to the witness; that the witness thereupon in my presence affixed his signature thereto.

                                                                                SIGNED

                                                                               Teruo MASATSUGU

 Subscribed and sworn to before me this 15th day of September 1946.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

                                                                       NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                  0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                  Investigating Officer

                                                                                  Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

Masaichi YAMAMOTO was interrogated at the Osaka Branch Office on 13 September 1946 by Lt. Sullivan.

Masaichi YAMAMOTO after being duly sworn to speak the truth conscientiously, adding nothing and concealing nothing whatsoever, testified as follows:

Q. What is your full name, age, address and nationality?

A. Masaichi YAMATOMO, 31 years. Murayama Yoshizu mura, Watarai gun, Mie Ken, Japanese.

Q. Do you expect to remain at your present address for the next six months, and if not how can your whereabouts in the future be ascertained?

A. Yes. 

Q. What is your present occupation?

A. I am a policeman of the Yoshizu Police Dept.

Q. What was your occupation during the war?

A. I was a policeman at the Matsuzaka Police Station of Mie Prefecture. I was transferred to the Yoshizu Police Dept. on 23 December 1945.

Q. State in your own words what you know of the B-29 crash near Yoshizu mura on 5 June 1945.

A. On that day I was working at the Matsuzaka Police Station which is about 50 miles away from Yoshizu mura. About two or three days later I heard from the other policemen that a B-29 crashed near Yoshizu mura in Mie Prefecture. That is about all I know about the crash and I didn’t see or hear anything about the fliers. I didn’t inquire anything about the crash when I came to Yoshizu in December 1945, as the incident happened quite some time ago.

Q. Do you know Mr. SUGIHARA?

A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where he was on 5 June 1945 when the B-29 crashed?

A. I don’t know where he was on that day as he was attached to the Yoshizu Police Dept. When I came to Yoshizu on the 23rd of December 1945, I learned that Mr. SUGIHARA was sick and was recuperating in Matsuzaka city. 

Q. Did you hear of any maltreatment given the fliers who survived the B-29 crash?

A. No.

Q. Do you have any further information that would aid in this investigation?

A. No, this is all I know. 

                                                                                Signature in Japanese

                                                                                 Masaichi YAMAMOTO

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Masaichi YAMAMOTO, being duly sworn on oath, state that I had read to me and understood the translation of the foregoing transcription of my interrogation and all answers contained therein, consisting of 1 page, are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.                

                                                                                      Signature in Japanese

                                                                                    Masaichi YAMAMOTO

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 13th day of September, 1946. 

                                                                NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                  0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                  Investigating Officer

                                                                                  Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Teruo MASATSUGU, 30115539, Pfc., AUS, being duly sworn on oath, state that I truly translated the questions and answers given from English to Japanese and from Japanese to English respectfully, and that after being transcribed, I truly translated the foregoing deposition containing 1 page, to the witness; that the witness thereupon in my presence affixed his signature thereto. 

                                                                                SIGNED

                                                                               Teruo MASATSUGU

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 13th day of September 1946. 

                                                                       NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                  0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                  Investigating Officer

                                                                                  Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

  

                                               CERTIFICATE 

I, Nicholas L. SULLIVAN, 0-527282, 1st Lt. F.A., Investigating Officer, Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP, certify that on the 13th day of September, 1946, personally appeared before me Masaichi YAMAMOTO, and according to Teruo Masatsugu, 30115539, Pfc. AUS, gave the foregoing answers to the several questions set forth therein; that after his testimony had been transcribed, the said Masaichi YAMAMOTO had read to him by the said interpreter the same and affixed his signature thereto in my presence.

                                                                       NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                  0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                  Investigating Officer

                                                                                  Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

OSAKA, JAPAN

13 Sep 1946  

Kanichi URAWA was interrogated at the Osaka Branch Office on 27 Sep 46 by Lt. Nicholas L. Sullivan.

I, Kanichi URAWA, after being duly sworn to speak the truth conscientiously, adding nothing and concealing nothing whatsoever, testified as follows:

Q. What is your full name, age, address and nationality?

A. Kanichi URAWA, 33, Mie Ken, Watarai-gun, Shimazu-mura, Kowaura 30. I am a Japanese.

 Q. Do you expect to remain at your present address for the next six months, and if not how can your whereabouts in the future be ascertained?

A. Yes.

 Q. What is your present occupation?

A. I have a clinic called URAWA Iin.

 Q. What was your occupation during the war?

A. Same as above.

Q. Did you see or treat any of the B-29 fliers that crashed near Shimazu on 5 June 1945?

A. On the 10th of June 1945 I was ordered by the Yamada Kempei-Tai to go to Kowaura Cemetery to view the remains of a B-29 flier that was found that same day near scene of the crash. The body appeared to be badly mangled and must have been in the plane when it crashed. I examined the body closely and found a bullet wound in the flier’s leg thigh. Above the wound I found the remains of a bandage that was probably used as a sort of tourniquet. The outer clothing and all the personal articles on the body of the flier were taken by three members of the Kempei-Tai before the body was buried. I then wrote a death certificate saying the flier either died before or in the crash.

 Q. Did you treat or see any other fliers?

A. No.

 Q. Did you hear about the other flier that was badly injured?

A. No, I did not see or hear about any flier being hurt or injured.

 Q. Did you ever hear what happened to these fliers that survived the crash?

A. No.

 Q. We have evidence that one of the fliers was badly injured and later died in a hospital in Yamada City. Do you know about this incident?

A. No, I never heard about it. I know there are four or five hospitals in Yamada City and the flier could have been taken to one of them.

 Q. Did you ever hear about any beatings or atrocities committed against these fliers?

A. No.

Q. Do you have any further information that would aid in the investigation of this case?

A. No.

                                                                       Signature in Japanese

                                                                             Kanichi URAWA

 ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Kanichi URAWA, being duly sworn on oath, state that I had read to me and understood the translation of the foregoing transcription of my interrogation and all answers contained therein, consisting of 1 page, are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.

                                                                                    Signature in Japanese                                                                                              

                                                                                        Kanichi URAWA

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 27th day of September, 1946.

                                                                            NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                Investigating Officer

                                                                                Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Louis SETO, 36932647, Pfc, USA, being duly sworn on oath, state that I truly translated the questions and answers given from English to Japanese and from Japanese to English respectfully, and that after being transcribed, I truly translated the foregoing deposition containing 1 page, to the witness; that the witness thereupon in my presence affixed his signature thereto.

                                                                                SIGNED

                                                                              Louis SETO 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 27th day of September 1946.

                                                                   NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                              0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                              Investigating Officer

                                                                              Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP 

                                               CERTIFICATE 

I, Nicholas L. SULLIVAN, 0-527282, 1st Lt. F.A., Investigating Officer, Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP, certify that on the 27th day of September, 1946, personally appeared before me Kanichi URAWA, and according to Louis SETO, 36932647, Pfc, USA, gave the foregoing answers to the several questions set forth therein; that after his testimony had been transcribed, the said Kanichi URAWA had read to him by the said interpreter the same and affixed his signature thereto in my presence.

                                                                       NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                  0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                  Investigating Officer

                                                                                  Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

OSAKA, JAPAN

27 Sep 1946

Jungo KATO was interrogated at the Osaka Branch Office on 17 Sep 1946 by Lt. Nicholas L. Sullivan.

 I, Jungo KATO, after being duly sworn to speak the truth conscientiously, adding nothing and concealing nothing whatsoever, testified as follows:

Q. What is your full name, age, address and nationality?

A. Jungo KATO, 40 years, Mitsuya-cho, Higashi Akuragawa, Yokkaichi City Mie Ken.

Q. Do you expect to remain at your present address for the next six months, and if not how can your whereabouts in the future be ascertained?

A. Yes.

Q. What is your present occupation?

A. I am a police-sergeant of the Yokkaichi Police Department. I’ve been there since December, 1945. 

Q. What was your occupation during the war?

A. I was a police-sergeant at Yoshizu Police Dept. I came there in June 1944 and left there in December 1945.

 Q. Did you see any of the captured fliers?

A. Yes, I saw three or four of the fliers that were captured the first day and as I did not see them at close distant I cannot describe their appearance.

Q. Did you see the injured flier?

A. Yes, the injured flier was lying on a small stretcher which was loaded on the back of the truck with the rest of the fliers.

Q. Did the people of the village try to beat these fliers while they were in the village of Shimazu?

A. No, I did not see or hear about any maltreatment given the fliers. Although the people were excited I did not hear any threats spoken against these fliers.

Q. Who gave the flier first aid in Shimazu?

A. I believe he was given first aid by the military men.

Q. Did the other fliers appear to be unhurt?

A. Yes, they appeared to be in good condition.

Q. We have evidence that one of the fliers was beaten and killed by the people and the police of the area. Please describe this incident?

A. I never heard of this incident. I don’t believe it is true.

Q. Do you know any of the names of the military men connected to this case?

A. No.

Q. What happened to the injured flier after he left Shimazu?

A. I heard that the flier died in Yamada City. I don’t know where he was treated or the doctor that handled the case.

Q. Do you have other information that would aid in the investigation of this case?

A. I don’t know the fliers names, ranks or where they were stationed. I know that an Army interpreter and a civilian interpreter spoke to the flier but I will try to locate the civilian interpreter as he may live in Shimazu.

                                                                                  Signature in Japanese             

                                                                                          Jungo KATO

 

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Jungo KATO, being duly sworn on oath, state that I had read to me and understood the translation of the foregoing transcription of my interrogation and all answers contained therein, consisting of 1 page, are true to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

                                                                                   Signature in Japanese                                                                                              

                                                                                           Jungo KATO

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of September, 1946.

                                                                            NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                Investigating Officer

                                                                                Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Teruo MASATSUGU, 30115539, Pfc., AUS, being duly sworn on oath, state that I truly translated the questions and answers given from English to Japanese and from Japanese to English respectfully, and that after being transcribed, I truly translated the foregoing deposition containing 1 page, to the witness; that the witness thereupon in my presence affixed his signature thereto. 

                                                                                         SIGNED

                                                                               Teruo MASATSUGU

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of September 1946.

                                                                             NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN                                                                                              

                                                                                0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                Investigating Officer

                                                                                Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

                                               CERTIFICATE

I, Nicholas L. SULLIVAN, 0-527282, 1st Lt. F.A., Investigating Officer, Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP, certify that on the 17th day of September, 1946, personally appeared before me Jungo KATO, and according to Teruo Masatsugu, 30115539, Pfc, AUS, gave the foregoing answers to the several questions set forth therein; that after his testimony had been transcribed, the said Jungo KATO had read to him by the said interpreter the same and affixed his signature thereto in my presence. 

                                                                       NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                  0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                  Investigating Officer

                                                                                  Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

OSAKA, JAPAN

18 Sep 1946

Riichi ODA was interrogated at the Osaka Branch Office on 17 Sep 1946 by Lt. Nicholas L. Sullivan.

I, Riichi ODA, after being duly sworn to speak the truth conscientiously, adding nothing and concealing nothing whatsoever, testified as follows:

 Q. What is your full name, age, address and nationality?

A. Riichi ODA, 38 years, 2684 Fujikata, Tsu City, Mie Pref., Japanese.

 Q. Do you expect to remain at your present address for the next six months, and if not how can your whereabouts in the future be ascertained?

A. Yes.

Q. What is your present occupation?

A. I am Chief of Secretary’s room at the Mie Prefecture Police Dept.

 Q. What was your occupation during the war?

A. I was the Chief of Police of the Yoshizu Police Department from December of 1944 to January 1946.

Q. Please state in your own words what you know about the B-29 that crashed near Shimazu last year?

On 5 June 1945 I was at a business meeting at Yamada City. Around 1000 hours I received a telephone message from Yoshizu Police Station stating that a B-29 plane had crashed near Shimazu village that morning around 0900 hours.  When I arrived at the police station in Yoshizu I was told that seven men parachuted survived the crash and were captured that same morning. Around 1640 hours I saw the army truck going in the direction of Yamada carrying the seven fliers pass in front of the police station. The fliers were in the back part of the truck tied and blind folded and guarded by one or two men from the Gokyo Division Unit, stationed at Isobe. I arrived at the scene of the crash around 1900 hours and it was too dark to see much of the crash. I talked to some of the people and they said that three other survivors that parachuted were not as yet captured. I conferred with members from the Kawazoe Unit and the Isobe Unit of the Gokyo Division. It was decided that members from the Kawazoe Unit and Isobe Unit would conduct the search and that the police would stay in Shimazu to prevent further outbreaks of fire caused by the crashed B-29 and protect the people from possible harm from the three fliers that were still at large. The next morning I again visited the scene of the crash and found that the plane was scattered along the Shimazu seashore. One of the gas tanks from the plane fell on one of the fishermen houses killing all five members therein. On the morning of the tenth I heard that one of fliers was captured walking down the mountain side by villagers from Shimazu. The villagers took the flier to city hall and turned the flier over to some military men from the Gokyo Division. Around 1100 hours two members from a Naval Unit stationed in Shimazu brought in two fliers that they captured that morning in the mountains. I saw these fliers in the Village Hall. They appeared to be unhurt and in good condition except they were very hungry. The fliers were fed and then two Kempei Tai men and a Sup Private from the Yamada Kempei took the fliers by train to Yamada Kempei Tai Hdq. Before the fliers left a soldier from the Gokyo Division questioned the three fliers in English. The fliers stated that they participated in the bombing of Kobe and that one of the fliers was fatality wounded over Kobe and that this flier must have died in the crash. A search was made and the fliers body was found about 1000 meters from the crash. The body still garbed in an unopen parachute was badly crushed. We carried the body down the mountain side and were met by a Warrant Officer from the Kempei Tai. The Warrant Officer took the fliers personal articles and then we dug a shallow hole and buried the remains.

Q. Do you know the names of any of the offices and men from the military units that participated in the search for the fliers?

A. No, I only remember the Warrant Officer’s last name which was Yoshida.

Q. Do you know any names of the villagers that captured the fliers?

A. No.

Q. Did the Keibo Dan capture any of the fliers?

A. No, I don’t think so. You might asked Mr. Kasai KYUJIRO who lives in Shimazu and was head of the Keibo Dan during the war.

Q. Were any of the fliers injured?

A. Yes, I heard that one of the first group of fliers captured by the villagers suffered a cut around his neck. I sent Policeman SAKAI to investigate the cause of the injury and SAKAI later stated that he talked to the man that captured the flier. This man claimed that the flier landed in a tree and injured his neck on a branch.

Q. Did this flier live?

A. I heard through rumors that the flier died later in Yamada City.

Q. Were Policemen SUGIHARA, KAWAI and YAMAMOTO in Shimazu village during August 1945?

A. No, SUGIHARA was sick and was recuperating in Matsuzaka City and YAMAMOTO was attached in the Matsuzaka police station and was not connected with our force. KAWAI was stationed in the Shimazu village at the time of the crash.

Q. We have evidence that you and other policemen from Yoshizu killed one of the American fliers?

A. No, that is not true. One of the fliers was killed in the crash and I received the report that the other flier was injured when he landed.

Q. Were these fliers beaten up by the villagers and did you see the beatings or any evidence of beatings?

A. No, I never heard about or have I ever seen any maltreatment given these fliers.

Q. Was the injured flier given first aid while in Shimazu?

A. I don’t know. I only saw the last three fliers and they appeared unhurt and in good condition.

Q. Do you have any further information to add to this statement?

A. No, I have told you everything I know.

                                                       

                                                                                Signature in Japanese

                                                                                         Riichi ODA

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Riichi ODA, being duly sworn on oath, state that I had read to me and understood the translation of the foregoing transcription of my interrogation and all answers contained therein, consisting of 2 pages, are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.

                                                                                    Signature in Japanese                                                                                              

                                                                                             Riichi ODA

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 17th day of September, 1946.

                                                                            NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                Investigating Officer

                                                                                Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Teruo MASATSUGU, 30115539, Pfc., AUS, being duly sworn on oath, state that I truly translated the questions and answers given from English to Japanese and from Japanese to English respectfully, and that after being transcribed, I truly translated the foregoing deposition containing 2 pages, to the witness; that the witness thereupon in my presence affixed his signature thereto. 

                                                                                         SIGNED

                                                                               Teruo MASATSUGU

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 17th day of September 1946. 

                                                             NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                Investigating Officer

                                                                                Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

                                               CERTIFICATE

I, Nicholas L. SULLIVAN, 0-527282, 1st Lt. F.A., Investigating Officer, Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP, certify that on the 17th day of September, 1946, personally appeared before me Riichi ODA, and according to Teruo Masatsugu, 30115539, Pfc, AUS, gave the foregoing answers to the several questions set forth therein; that after his testimony had been transcribed, the said Riichi ODA had read to him by the said interpreter the same and affixed his signature thereto in my presence.

                                                                       NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                  0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                  Investigating Officer

                                                                                  Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

OSAKA, JAPAN

17 Sep 1946

Shiro SAKAI was interrogated at the Osaka Branch Office on 17 Sep 1946 by Lt. Nicholas L. Sullivan.

I, Shiro SAKAI, after being duly sworn to speak the truth conscientiously, adding nothing and concealing nothing whatsoever, testified as follows:

Q. What is your full name, age, address and nationality?

A. Shiro SAKAI, 46 years, Kawaura Shimazu-mura, Watarai-gun, Mie Pref.

Q. Do you expect to remain at your present address for the next six months, and if not how can your whereabouts in the future be ascertained?

A. Yes.

Q. What is your present occupation?

A. I am a policeman working at the Police Box at Shimazu-mura.

Q. What was your occupation during the war?

A. I was a policeman working at a Police Box at Nakajima-mura from Aug 1944 to Oct 1945.

Q. Did you investigate the cause of the injuries received by one of the fliers that parachuted near Shimazu last year?

A. Yes, when I first arrived at the Shimazu Police Station last October 1945 I was ordered by police Chief Riichi ODA to investigate the cause of the injuries received by the flier.

Q. Why did the Chief of Police order the investigation of this case at this time?

A. The Police Chief wanted material on the case on hand so if the Allied Forces investigated the case he would be able to help them.

Q. Please describe what you found out during this investigation?

A. I found out that Mr. NODA, Toshio captured this flier. Mr. NODA stated that this fliers parachute landed in a group of small trees. Mr. NODA stated he found the flier lying on the ground at the foot of one of the trees. The back of the fliers head was cut and Mr. NODA believes that the flier either cut his head on some branches or suffered a grazing bullet wound from one of the fighter planes that tried to machine gun him on the way down. Mr. NODA said that it was necessary to have the flier carried to the village hall.

Q. We have evidence that the flier was beaten. Did you come across any facts about this evidence?

A. No, I never heard about it.

Q. Were any of the fliers beaten by the towns people?

A. Out of the first group of fliers captured I heard that only one was injured and that the rest were in good condition. From my investigation I believed the fliers were not mistreated in any way.

Q. Do you have any other facts that would be of interest in this case?

A. No.

                                                                               Signature in Japanese

                                                                                       Shiro SAKAI

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )                      

I, Shiro SAKAI, being duly sworn on oath, state that I had read to me and understood the translation of the foregoing transcription of my interrogation and all answers contained therein, consisting of 1 page, are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.

                                                                                    Signature in Japanese                                          

                                                                                            Shiro SAKAI

 Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of September, 1946.

                                                                            NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                Investigating Officer

                                                                                Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Teruo MASATSUGU, 30115539, Pfc., AUS, being duly sworn on oath, state that I truly translated the questions and answers given from English to Japanese and from Japanese to English respectfully, and that after being transcribed, I truly translated the foregoing deposition containing 1 page, to the witness; that the witness thereupon in my presence affixed his signature thereto. 

                                                                                         SIGNED

                                                                               Teruo MASATSUGU

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of September 1946.

                                                                             NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN                                                                                              

                                                                                0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                Investigating Officer

                                                                                Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

                                               CERTIFICATE

I, Nicholas L. SULLIVAN, 0-527282, 1st Lt. F.A., Investigating Officer, Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP, certify that on the 18th day of September, 1946, personally appeared before me Shiro SAKAI, and according to Teruo Masatsugu, 30115539, Pfc, AUS, gave the foregoing answers to the several questions set forth therein; that after his testimony had been transcribed, the said Shiro SAKAI had read to him by the said interpreter the same and affixed his signature thereto in my presence.

                                                                       NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                  0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                  Investigating Officer

                                                                                  Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

OSAKA, JAPAN

18 Sep 1946

Kyuzo KASAI was interrogated at the Osaka Branch Office on the 18th of September by Lt. Sullivan.

Kyuzo KASAI, after being duly sworn to speak the truth conscientiously, adding nothing and concealing nothing whatsoever, testified as follows:

Q. What is your full name, age, address and nationality?

A. Kyuzo KASAI, 47 years, Kowaura, Shimazu-mura, Watarai gun, Mie Ken.

Q. Do you expect to remain at your present address for the next six months, and if not how can your whereabouts in the future be ascertained?

A. Yes.

Q. What is your present occupation?

A. I have a small store in Shimazu where I sell rationed products such as Shoyu sauce and Miso.

Q. What was your occupation during the war?

A. I was head of the Shimazu Keibo Dan from the beginning of August 1943 to the end of the war.

Q. Please describe in your own words what you know about the B-29 that crashed near Shimazu last year?

A. Around 0830 hours on the 5 June 1945 I was working at the City Hall in Shimazu when I heard some children yell that a B-29 was burning in the sky. I ran out just in time to see the plane dive in flames. Before the plane crashed I counted ten opened parachutes in the sky. There was a Japanese fighter plane firing its machine guns when the plane was diving and I don’t know if the blasts were for the plane or for the fliers that had parachuted. The plane crashed near the Shimazu seashore, killing five occupants of a fisherman’s house and the burning gasoline started two raging fires in the area. I helped fight one of the fires and when I returned to the City Hall early in the afternoon, I saw three fliers in one of the rooms. The fliers were standing and were being questioned by a military man that had come from one of the military establishments in that section. I returned to the scene of the crash to help fight the other fire that was started by the plane. I came back to the Shimazu City Hall in time to see the seven fliers being loaded on an Army truck. Six of the fliers were standing and appeared to be unhurt and in good condition but the seventh flier was lying on a stretcher. Although I didn’t get close enough to examine the condition of the seventh flier. I heard later that this flier suffered an injury on his neck. Mr. Noda, the man who captured the flier stated that he found the flier in this condition. I believe the truck took the fliers to a Military establishment in Yamada City. On the 10th of June 1945, around 0800 hours a flier captured by some villagers was brought to City Hall. I heard that this flier was seen by some villagers walking down the road. They were excited and they called the Village Office by telephone and asked what they should do. The Village Office told them to capture the flier and take him to the Village Hall. Around 1100 hours two Naval men brought two fliers that they had captured in the mountains earlier in the day. I saw these fliers at the City Hall and they appeared unhurt and in good condition. I believe the fliers were given food and water while they were at the City Hall. The fliers were questioned by an Army interpreter and y Mr. Yasuda from Shimazu. One of the fliers stated that one of their crewmembers was wounded over Kobe and died before the plane crashed. The Kempei Tai took the fliers by train to Yamada City that afternoon.

Q. Did any of these fliers appeared to have been beaten?

A. No, except for the injured one they appeared to be in good condition.

Q. Didn’t this injured flier receive his wounds from the beatings given him by the villagers?

A. I don’t know how the fliers were treated by the Military after they left Shimazu, but I believe they were not maltreated while they were in the Shimazu area.

Q. Do you know the units or names of any of the military men that helped search for the fliers?

A. No.

Q. Do you have any further information that would aid in the investigation of this case?

A. No.

ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )                      

I, Kyuzo KASAI, being duly sworn on oath, state that I had read to me and understood the translation of the foregoing transcription of my interrogation and all answers contained therein, consisting of 1 page, are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.

                                                                                    Signature in Japanese                                                                                              

                                                                                          Kyuzo KASAI

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of September, 1946.

                                                                            NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                Investigating Officer

                                                                                Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

 ALLIED OCCUPATION FORCES)

                                                      : SS.

CITY OF OSAKA                          )

I, Teruo MASATSUGU, 30115539, Pfc., AUS, being duly sworn on oath, state that I truly translated the questions and answers given from English to Japanese and from Japanese to English respectfully, and that after being transcribed, I truly translated the foregoing deposition containing 1 page, to the witness; that the witness thereupon in my presence affixed his signature thereto. 

                                                                                         SIGNED

                                                                               Teruo MASATSUGU

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of September 1946.

                                            NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN                                                        

                                                          0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                          Investigating Officer

                                                                           Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

                                               CERTIFICATE

I, Nicholas L. SULLIVAN, 0-527282, 1st Lt. F.A., Investigating Officer, Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP, certify that on the 18th day of September, 1946, personally appeared before me Kyuzo KASAI, and according to Teruo Masatsugu, 30115539, Pfc, AUS, gave the foregoing answers to the several questions set forth therein; that after his testimony had been transcribed, the said Kyuzo KASAI had read to him by the said interpreter the same and affixed his signature thereto in my presence.

                                                                       NICHOLAS L. SULLIVAN

                                                                                  0-527282, 1st Lt. FA

                                                                                  Investigating Officer

                                                                                  Legal Section, GHQ, SCAP

                                                                                        Date    1 August 1947

           Report of Investigative Division, Legal Section, GHQ. SCAP

Inv. Div. No.     73                 CRD No.               Report To:   William R. Gill

Title: Lt. General Tasuku OKADA, et al.

Synopsis of facts:

Details concerning the Execution of 27 B-29 Crewmen at Tokai Army Headquarters have been reported on by Shigayoshi SUZUKI, former Japanese Lt. General and Judge Advocate for the Eastern District Army Headquarters, and are set out.

DETAILS:

At Tokyo:

This report is based on the receipt of Document #27472 from the Translation Section of ATIS. This document was secured from the Japanese and was translated. It is being set out as indicated in report dated 7 February 1947. Previous portions of this document were set out in other reports and were as follows: On 7 February 1947, a written opinion was set out. This was translated by SUZUKI and was not sent to ATIS. On 24 March 1947, ATIS Document #27474-B was received concerning the “ONISHI Plan” and was set out. On 13 April 1947, ATIS Document #27468 was received and was set out concerning information of Western Army and Tokai Army Murders. On 30 June 1947, ATIS Document #27474 was received concerning sworn statements which were secured from Tokai Army Personnel and were set out. On 3 July 1947, ATIS Document #27469 was received concerning sworn statements which were secured from Western Army Personnel and were set out. ATIS Document #27472 has been received from ATIS and is being transmitted to the Criminal Registry Division with their copy of this report. The original Japanese document is being transmitted to the Criminal Registry Division and the translation of that document reads as follows:

Doc. No. 27472                                                     SPECIAL TRANS. TEAM

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS

SUPREME COMMANDER FOR THE ALLIED FORCES POWERS

MILITARY INTELLIGENCE SECTION, GENERAL STAFF

ALLIED TRANSLATOR AND INTERPRETER SECTION  

NOTE: Translation Requested by Legal Section

Received ATIS:  11 Feb 47.

Description of Contents: Record of atrocities on captured enemy air personnel  in the TOKAI Area.     

Doc. No. 27472

Top Secret

No. IV of 10 copies

Detailed Report on the Execution of the 27 B-29 Crewmembers  

I.                    From the establishment of the TOKAI Army Headquarters on 11 Feb 45 until the termination of the war, 44 B-29 airmen landed alive within the jurisdiction of that headquarters. The first six airmen were taken prisoner due to evidence of their having attacked military objectives. The next 11, who landed on 14 May, were committed for trial by court martial on suspicion of having committed serious war crimes due to their bombing of non-military objectives. The remaining 27, who landed in the later part of May and who had committed inhumane and indiscriminate bombing, were executed in accordance with military regulations without proper procedure due to the situation at that time.

 

II.                  The following are the details of the execution of the 27 war criminals.

 

A.    About May of this year, the Army came to the conclusion that the Allied Forces would land on JAPAN proper around August. The entire Army was absorbed in operational preparations, and activity at Headquarters increased tremendously. Eleven airmen, who had participated in the bombing of non-military objectives at NAGOYA on 14 May, were taken captive. While discussions were held about committing them for trial by court-martial, the number of airmen captive increased due to the intensified air raids.

 

It was revealed through questioning these airmen that, since the latter part of May, the air raids by the enemy had been converted entirely into inhumane, indiscriminate city bombing aiming at the murder of citizens and the burning and destroying of private homes.

 

                 B. As time went on, military operational activities increased                  

                      greatly and the situation demanded speedy action. Despite     

                      the Government’s and the people’s absolute co-operation, the               

                      damage by indiscriminate bombing increased to serious  proportions, and the feeling of hostility was raised to its highest point. On the other hand, the successive severe air raids day after day made the handling of these airmen very difficult. Under the circumstances, it was impossible to waste many days in the complicated procedure of a court-martial. Toward the middle of June, the army commander requested the chief of the Judicial Section, OKADA, and Senior Staff Officer ONISHI for speedy action in court-martial trials and ordered the study of a convenient method of adapting military regulations to cover the remaining airmen.

 

III.                After consultation with other staff officers concerned. Colonel OHISHI, senior staff officer, reached the conclusion that those airmen who were found to have carried out indiscriminate bombing contrary to the laws of humanity should be executed according to martial law without the legal procedure of a court-martial. Chief to the Judicial Section, OKADA, also agreed with him, regarding it as an inevitable consequence of the circumstances. He then reported to the chief of staff and the commander and obtained their authorizations.

 

IV.               As the evidence of indiscriminate, inhumane bombing became clarified through the investigation of the enemy 27 airmen who parachuted down during late May and early June, Colonel ONISHI reported to the commander, and, according to his orders, the former informed Colonel YONEMARU, the aide-de-camp, through Staff Officer YASUDA, of the decision to execute the fliers.

 

V.                 Thus Colonel YONEMARU ordered Captain YAMADA to execute 11 of the 27 fliers who had parachuted down earlier and then ordered captain NARITA to execute the following 16.

 

VI.               Captain YAMADA, commanding 13 non-commissioned officers and men on 28 June, transported the 11 fliers in a truck and had them executed at Mt. MIYAJI, AKATSU-Machi, SETO-Shi.

 

VII.             Captain NARITA, commanding eight officers and men on 14 July, had the rest executed at the grounds behind the second building of headquarters.

 

VIII.           After the execution, their bodies were cremated. Most of their ashes were laid in the TSUSHIMA Crematory and the rest were placed at the NAGOYA Army Cemetery.

 

IX.               Their belongings forwarded with them were sized and confiscated, but some of them were destroyed with the second building of headquarters in the air raid. The rest were burned at the termination of the war with secret wartime documents. Those which remained untouched were left in the custody of headquarters but in late November were handed over to the US Army in compliance with orders.

I copied the above from the report from TOKAI District Demobilization Inspector to the Army Demobilization Minister. 

               17 Dec 45

 

                The First Demobilization Board Higher Court

                 Recorder:   OKANO, Torakichi

 

Doc. No. 27472

                                       Sworn Statement 

I swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.

                                                                          25 Feb 46

                                                                          Witness: YAMADA, Rikio

                                        Interrogation of Witness

Witness: YAMADA, Rikio

Accused: a) OKADA, Jasuku

Charge: Murder

               b) ONISHI, Hajime

Charge: Aiding and Abetting Murder

The examining officer, FURUKAWA, Mamoru, interrogated the witness at the TOKAI Army District Demobilization Board Local Court in the presence of the recorder, MIURA, Minoru, on 25 Jan 46, as follows:

Question: What is your name, age, address, and occupation?

Answer: Name: YAMADDA, Sukeo

               Age: 30

               Address: AICHI Ken, ICHI Gun, HATAYAMA Mura, Oaza                     

               YAMAGUCHI, Aza TANAKA, 386 Banchi.

               Occupation: Director of the TOKAI- HOKURIKU Branch of the Food     

               Commodities Section, All-Japan Agricultural Association.

The examining officer ascertained that the witness did not come under Clause 1, Article 236, of the military regulations and told YAMADA that he would be questioned as a witness and that it would be considered perjury if he gave any false information and he would be punished accordingly. He than placed the witness under oath.

Question: Did you have anything to do with the execution of B-29 crewmembers by the TOKAI District Army?

Answer: In accordance with an order from the commanding officer, there were two executions of B-29 crewmembers. I took part in the first execution, but Capt NARITA, Kikumoto participated in the second one.

Question: What was your military career like?

Answer: I graduated from the private commercial school connected with the Central Association of Industrial Unions in TOKYO Shi, KOJIMACHI Ku, YURAKU Cho, in March 1935. I was drafted into the conscript reserve on 25 Oct 37 and was discharged on 25 Feb 38. I was called up for service again on 24 Sep 38 and was sent to North CHINA on active duty and was appointed a reserve officer candidate. I was commissioned a second lieutenant on 1 Aug 40 and was promoted to first lieutenant on 10 Mar 42. I was discharged on 15 Aug 43. I was called up again to the 2nd Central Army on 21 Jan 45 and was assigned to the Administrative Section of the Division Headquarters. On 11 Feb 45, I was transferred to the Administrative Section of the TOKAI District Army and was ordered to duty in the Supervising Section in July. At the end of the war, I was transferred to Operations Section and on 3 November, I was demobilized. I had been promoted to captain on 20 August.

Question: What was your post of duty when you took part in the execution of the B-29 crewmembers?

Answer: I was on general duty as an officer attached to the Administrative Section of the TOKAI District Army.

Question: When were the airmen executed?

Answer: I think it was on 28 Jun 45.

Question: Describe the conditions under which you were ordered to execute them?

Answer: On June 27, the day before the executions, when I was on duty in the Administration Section, Col. YONEMARU, Masakuma, (senior administrative officer) who was my superior officer, entered and told me that the commanding officer had ordered the execution of the B-29 crewmembers. He said that they would be executed in the vicinity of SETO, and while looking at a map on the wall, ordered me to carry out the executions of the 11 airmen who had come in first since I was well acquainted with the SETO area as I commuted to the post from SETO. He further ordered me to select carefully the personnel required for the executions and to conceal our intention of execution. Furthermore, he added that the airmen would be executed by sword. Of course, I stood at attention while he was giving me the order. It took place perhaps at noon of that day, but I cannot recall the exact time.

After receiving the order, I summoned Sgt. YAMAMOTO, Eiichiro and Sgt. FUJITA, Yoshitaka, both of whom were attached to the Administrative Section at that time and told them the gist of the order and ordered them to go to the execution grounds. 

Then I explained the order to 1st Lt. NARITA, then in charge of the guards (he took part in the second execution and was later promoted to captain) and asked him to send me the suitable number of men. He agreed to my proposal and I went to the office of the senior administrative officer and reported the above-mentioned account to him. I told him that I would execute the airmen the next day.

Then I ordered Pfc. HIRANABE of the Transportation Division of the Administrative Section to get a truck ready for the next day.

That evening I received from Capt. NARITA a roster of the executioners which I called before we started out on the following day. The executioners were as follows:

Sgt. KAWAKAMI (later promoted to sergeant major)

Sgt. KONDO

Cpl. TSUCHIYAMA

Cpl. FURUYAMA (later promoted to sergeant)

Superior Pvt. SERIYAMA

Superior Pvt. HAYASHI

Superior Pvt. KOBAYASHI

Superior Pvt. OMINAYA

Superior Pvt. UCHIYAMA

Superior Pvt. KOGISO 

All of these 12 soldiers were guards.

Question: How did you reach the scene of the execution on the 38th and what preparations did you make there?

Answer: On the preceding day, I had told Capt. NARITA the gist of the adjutant general’s order when I asked him to bring out the 11 previously captured airmen before our departure. At about 0930 on the 285h, the day of the executions, Capt. NARITA called on me in the Administrative Section and told me that the preparations had been completed. Then I told the adjutant general that I was just about to begin the executions of the airmen and told him the names and grades of the executioners.

At the front gate, I found that they were ready to start out as Capt. NARITA had told me. The 11 airmen were forced to sit on a rug spread on the back of the truck (TOKAI truck No. 3). They were blindfolded and had their hands tied behind their backs. The non-commissioned officers and men had been ordered to go to the scene of the execution, surrounded the fliers and remained standing so that no one on the outside could catch a glimpse of the airmen. I took my seat on the front platform. We started out about 1000.

At about 1100, we arrived at YAMAMICHI in the southeastern part of SETO. The place of execution was halfway up a hill, about 2 km from the base. After our arrival there, we selected a place where the ground was comparatively level. We cut down the brush and cleaned out a natural hole. There were no people there, which caused me to be confident that the airmen could be secretly executed as was ordered.

After the place had been cleaned up, I told my subordinates that the prisoners should be killed with a single sword stroke and that they should be executed one after another. The airmen had been taken to a spot about 100 m from the execution site.

Question: How were the airmen executed?

Answer: In accordance with their orders, the executioners carried out their duties in order of seniority. However, I do not know the name’s of the airmen. Each executioner took an airman from the guards and led him to the aforementioned pit where the executioner cut off the victim’s head in the traditional BUSHIDO manner. I stood nearby during the executions and watched, wondering if they would conduct themselves with dignity. Each killed his assigned prisoner with one sword stroke. I think that it took more than an hour for us to execute all the airmen, since we had to bring them individually from their position, 100 m from the scene. It was about 1630 when we came back to our quarters.

Question: Did you tell the airmen before the execution that they were going to be killed?

Answer: No, but their behavior and departure, on the way out, and at the scene made me believe that they knew of their impending execution before their departure. At the very moment of execution, they conducted themselves with bravery and composure, which also confirmed my presumption.

Question: Did you ask for the wills of the airmen before their execution?

Answer: No, I did not.

Question: Did a medical officer accompany them?

Answer: No. 

Question: How did you dispose of the dead bodies?

Answer: Each body was buried in the hole with due ceremony. We received this suggestion from the senior administrative officer.

Question: How were the airmen dressed?

Answer: They were dressed in the same clothes as when they made the air raid. They were buried with their clothes on.

Question: How did you deal with their belongings?

Answer: There were dressed as related above and did not have any belongings.

Question: were they interned before the execution?

Answer: I heard that they were interned in the headquarters building. But I am not sure about it, since it was not my duty.

Question: Did you give anything to the airmen at the execution place?

Answer: Water was prepared for them before they started from headquarters. It was given to them at their request. It was given also on the way to the execution place.

Question: Did they act as if they wanted to say something before the execution?

Answer: No, their self-composed behavior was so admirable that I was impressed.

Question: Did you set any grave posts?

Answer: No, I set nothing, since I was not prepared. But I planted a pine tree.

Question: How is the place now?

Answer: Towards 18 August, I was ordered by Major YASUDA to cremate the buried bodies and to bring their remains back. The executioners of before exhumed the bodies to cremate them. I returned with the remains in a box and handed it over to the guard unit. The box was to be enshrined in the unit. I heard later that they were buried afterwards in the NAGOYA Military Cemetery. But I have no detailed information about it. 

Question: How did you dispose of the Japanese swords which were used for the executions?

Answer: The swords were a present from citizens to the Army. They were distributed to the command after the execution. I suppose they have been presented to the Allied authorities. I am not too sure, but I will add for your information that three swords were used for the execution and that some of the executioners might have used their own swords.

Question: When were the swords handed to the executioners?

Answer: They were handed to them at the execution place. The senior administrative officer suggested the use of these swords.

Question: Do you know who the executioners were?

Answer: I think the executioners were: YAMAMOTO, FUJITA, KONDO, TSUCHIYAMA, FURUKAWA, KAWAKAMI AND HAYASHI.

Question: Who owned and administered the place of execution?

Answer: It was owned by the Prefectural Government (TN the AICHI Prefectural Government) and administrated by nobody. The Army used the place and did not have any connection with the Prefectural Government.

Question: What did you hear from the senior administrative officer when you reported the execution to him?

Answer: When I reported it to him, he asked, “Was the execution carried out with the utmost solemnity?” I answered “Yes.”

Question: Were the fliers aware of the fact they were tried by a military tribunal?

Answer: Yes, I knew that the prosecutor of the military tribunal examined them.

Question: Did you ever investigate whether the fliers could be executed without trial by military tribunal or not?

Answer: I remember reading that the fliers should not be executed without trial by military tribunal. I have also studied the problem. When I was ordered by the senior administrative officer on the 27th, I thought that the executions was ordered by the commander after the decision of the military tribunal. I think it was about the middle of July when I found out that these airmen had not been committed for trial by the military tribunal. It was when Major ITO, of the Judicial Section, asked me whether SETO was a competent place for the execution of the 11 airmen who had been committed by the military tribunal in the middle of July.

Question: At that time did you consider the choice of executioners?

Answer: I thought that only those who had confidence in their ability could solemnly execute prisoners at a single stroke. I selected YAMAMOTO and FUJITA from the administrative Staff and asked Capt. NARITA to select suitable officers for the execution. I selected men of ability as executioners from among those who were sent by Capt. NARITA. Others were used as observers.

Question: Have you anything to add to your statement? 

Answer: I have nothing to add to my statement. Now, from democratic points of view, some people are criticizing the absolute obedience in the Japanese Army. Believing that I should absolutely obey the orders of the senior administrative staff officers, my immediate superior, I executed those airmen.

Question: I wish to ask you again where these airmen were executed?

Answer: It was at AICHI Ken, AKAZU Cho, YAMAJI. It is Prefectural land. Since it is situated on the boundary between SETO Shi and HATAYAMA Mura. Some people call it AICHI Ken, AICHI Gun, HATAYAMA mura, Oaza YAMAGUCHI, TAMAJI.

Question: Do you remember the order of the executioners?

Answer: The order was: FUJITA, KONDO, YAMAMOTO, TSUCHIYAMA, FURUKAWA, KAWAKAMI, HAYASHI, FUJITA, KONDO, YAMAMOTO AND TSUCHIYAMA. That is, each of the first four executed two airmen.

                                                       YAMADA, Rikio                  (Seal)

We wrote his statement down and read it to him. Admitting it was the truth, he signed and affixed his seal to this document on the same day at the First Army Demobilization Board Local Court.

Recorder at the First Army Demobilization Board Higher Court:

MIURA, Minoru    (Seal)

Preliminary Examining Officer at First Army Demobilization Board Higher Court: FURUKAWA, Mamoru     (Seal)  

 

The following is not part of this document 27427

Nine of the following ten B-29er’s were executed from the crew of “Black Jack Too” one was wounded in his parachute jump and died, or was executed, the day after the crash. That man is unknown.

Pilot (AC)            1st  Lt. PALMER, Woodrow B.

Pilot                2nd Lt. WALLS, Owen P.                   

Navigator            2nd Lt. DAILEY, Robert F.                  

Bombardier            1st Lt. COULTER, Don A.                      

Engineer            Sgt. FARISH, Henry T. Jr. 

Radar Op.            M/Sgt. PROUTY, Eugene J.    

Radio Op.            S/Sgt CHAPMAN, Willard M.                 

Gunner            S/Sgt. NILES, Cleveland T.            

Gunner            Sgt. SABO, Peter                                                

Gunner         Sgt. MEISLER, Charles A.   

Also executed with the “Black Jack Too” crew were the following survivors of the 40th Bomb Group B-29 42-24984, Mansel Clark’s crew, lost on May 29, 1945.

Pilot               Lt. HURLEY, Richard M.   

Gunner          Sgt. ROBERTSON, Elgie L. 

Report & file Provided by Sparky Corradina

 

"Coconuts!"

 

Pete Sabo - Obituary from local newspaper

 

The photos below are of the execution site in modern day Japan.  Toru Fukubayashi took these pictures especially for Betty Gracie - (c) Toru Fukubayashi.  The Association would like to sincerely thank Mr. Fukubayashi for his continued contributions to the history of the B-29 and our Veterans.

 

Top of page

 

All images,  photographs,  documents,  logos,  graphics,  and all other parts of this website are the sole property of The Official 444th BG Association (unless otherwise noted or specified) - (c) 444thBG, All rights reserved.  Unauthorized duplication, distribution, transmission, printing, publishing, or recording (in/or on any media known or unknown) of the contents of this site is a violation of applicable laws.  Any and all use for non-profit means is hereby fully granted by the site owner.  Commercial undertakings of ANY nature using ANY material from this site are expressly forbidden without the advance written permission of the site owner, and/or the owner of said material(s).